Plantar Fasciitis

posted on 11 Mar 2014 20:52 by donnalifts

There are a number of methods which can be used to reduce the pain from plantar fasciitis. Treating plantar fasciitis usually involves medication to ease the pain. This is most commonly anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID's) which are helpful in alleviating pain as well as reducing inflammation. Sometimes corticosteroids may be administered either topically or by injection into the plantar fascia directly, although this is usually reserved for only the most severe cases. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) can be used to good effect, with the treatment using painless sound waves to help the healing process.

The next crucial thing to do is immediately put on a comfortable pair of shoes and orthotic shoe insoles. This will help to cushion and support the bottom of your foot and help to keep it from more injury. If you utilize the proper plantar fasciitis stretching exercises and arch support inserts, you will see a great improvement in your heel pain. You should really pay attention to your body and if you are aware of foot pain, talk to a doctor as soon as possible. This will ensure that your pain does not become a more serious issue.

Your next Plantar Fasciitis exercise is stretching of the plantar fascia using a bath towel. Put a rolled up towel under the ball of one foot, holding both ends of the towel with your left and right hand. Next, slowly pull the towel towards you, while keeping your knee straight (the other knee may be bent). Hold this position for 15 to 20 seconds. Repeat 4 times and change to the other foot, if necessary. (It's always good to do these exercises on both feet, even if you only experience heel pain in one foot, as this will help prevent the heel problem to come back in your other foot!)

Stretches - Opt for plantar fasciitis stretches for your calf muscles. They help in relaxing the muscles, easing the pain and also in quick recovery. The exercise is very simple. You just need to stand facing a wall. Lean on the wall with the help of your hands with the palms resting on the wall. Place one leg in front and bend the knee. Ensure that you do not put any weight on this leg. Let the other leg be straight with the heel touching the floor. Now, move your hips towards the wall till you feel a stretch.

Icing your heel will decrease inflammation that accumulates while you walk during the day, and to prevent more inflammation while you sleep. Apply ice to the sore area for 20 minutes two or three times a day to relieve your symptoms. Do not go barefoot or wear flip-flops. Only wear shoes with a moderate heel that do not bend through the arch. Always wear shoes when walking, even in the home. If you have custom orthotics, or over-the-counter inserts, wear them in your shoes at all times. The majority of people with plantar fasciitis improve tremendously after just two months of initial treatment.plantar fasciitis stretches

When you go in to see your podiatrist about the pain in the bottom of your heel, be sure to come prepared to answer questions (and ask questions of your own, of course). Your doctor will probably want to know a history of your symptoms and will perform a physical exam of your foot to check for swelling and redness. He or she may also check for tenderness on the foot to find out where the pain is coming from. You may need to get X-rays to check for other possible sources of your pain (such as stress fractures).

Plantar fasciitis is a foot disorder usually felt as pain in the bottom of your foot around the heel. There are around 2 million new cases of this disorder reported each year in the USA only. That pain especially hurts the first thing in the morning when you try to get out of bed, or after sitting for awhile. This pain is caused by an injury of the fascia band at the bottom of the foot. This tissue is called the plantar fascia and it connects the heel bone to the toes. Mostly this injury is caused by overload of the foot.

Stand barefoot, with your feet hip-width apart and with your left foot in a slightly forward position - two to three inches ahead of your right foot. The bottoms of the toes of your left foot should be in contact with a wall in front of you (the wall should be creating a forced dorsiflexion of the toes, so that the sole of the left foot is on the ground but the toes are on the wall), and your left knee should be bent slightly. Keep your weight evenly distributed between your right and left foot to start the exercise (see note below).

The Achilles tendon is a group of tissues that connect the heel bone to your calf muscles. When these are inflamed, you have Achilles tendonitis. The plantar fascia is also a group of tissues; but, this links the toes to your heel. Home remedies work well for both the conditions. The treatment of plantar fasciitis and Achilles tendonitis are almost the same. When ice packs and stretching exercises don't work for plantar fasciitis, it may be advisable for you to visit a podiatrist. A new therapy called ESWT or 'Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy' is recommended. The therapy may take about 4 months for complete cure.

How quickly you can return to running will depend on the severity of your injury and how fast you heal. Some runners find that they can work their way back into running even while some residual arch stiffness persists, but if running is making your arch pain worse, you need more time off and more time for your rehab program to do its job. As you return to running, consider increasing your stride frequency by 10% or so to reduce your impact loading rate,16 a factor connected with the development of plantar fasciitis in runners. plantar fasciitis exercises

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